VegBox Recipes

Gem Squash

Gem Squash Gem squash is small and round - about the size of a large grapefruit. It's deep green skin sets it apart from other squashes.

It's often overlooked, in favour of its more famous cousins the butternut squash and pumpkin.

Yet gem squash is worthy of its own recipes, with its orange flesh having a slightly sweeter flavour than other squashes.

Find out more about gem squash, how to use it, how to store it and even try out some gem squash recipes.

Buy?
Choose a firm squash that makes a hollow sound when tapped. The skin should be dark green and shiny.

Watch out for any rotting around the stalk - a clear sign that this gem squash is past its best.
Store?
Keep in a cool dark cupboard for a week or two.
Cook?
You can either bake them whole - just pierce them a few times with a sharp knife, to allow steam to escape.

Or you can peel them with a potato peeler, cut them in half, remove the seeds and either roast (coated with olive oil for 1/2 hour at 190 C) or remove the flesh, cut into chunks and steam for up to 10 minutes.

Delicious served on its own or incorporated in any squash recipe.

More Gem Squash Information

Gem squash are sometimes called cannon balls, because of their shape and colour.

They're related to pumpkins and butternut squash.

Their outer skin is a tough protection for the sweet flesh inside.

Unlike pumpkins, their seeds generally aren't eaten.


Did you know...?
Gem squash are a good source of beta-carotene (for Vitamin A production), as well as Vitamin C and anti-oxidants.

Buttered Gem Squash
This recipe is really simple - just bake the squash, scoop out the flesh and mix with butter and salt. And it mostly cooks itself, while you get on with the rest of dinner.
Ingredients
  • ½ gem squash per person
  • 15g butter per person
  • Pinch of salt

Method
  1. Chop the gem squash in half.


  2. Remove the stalk and use a dessert spoon to scoop out all the seeds. If you leave them in, the squash can taste bitter.

  3. Put the two halves of the squash back together and wrap loosely in foil. Make sure you are allowing any steam to escape, but not letting the juices leak.

  4. Bake at 180 degrees C for about ½ hour, or until the orange squash flesh is soft.

  5. Allow the squash to cool until it is safe to handle using a tea towel.

  6. Use a dessert spoon to scoop out the flesh into a bowl.

  7. Add the butter and the salt and mix well.

  8. For an impressive serving effect, you can use the hardened squash shells to serve this.

Makes a great side dish for any meal that's potentially a bit dry, such as grilled chicken or lentil loaf.


Cupboard-To-Table

About 1 hour, allowing for squash to bake in the oven

Suggested Gem squash Recipes

Baked Gem Squash

Baking gem squash is one of the simplest ways of serving them. Being small, gem squash work particularly well and they bake evenly.

Buttered Gem Squash

This recipe is really simple - just bake the squash, scoop out the flesh and mix with butter and salt. And it mostly cooks itself, while you get on with the rest of dinner.

Creamy Parsnip & Squash Bake

This recipe has been generously shared by the lovely folks over at Foodari.

Hearty Butternut Squash and Red Onion Soup

This recipe for butternut squash and red onion soup was submitted to us by Kelly Stewart and is on test for you to try. Why not give it a go and let us know what you think!

Honest to Goodness' Cinnamon Roasted Seasonal Vegetables

This recipe was donated to us by Paul at our 'Scouse Veg' friends, "Honest To Goodness" who contacted us to be added to our free directory of vegbox providers.

We love how simple this is, and we love the cinnamon variation on roasting whatever's in season.

Pumpkin, Sage And Pine Nut Ravioli

This is a variation on a classic autumnal Italian dish. It takes a while to prepare, but it's so delicious, it's worth the effort. Pumpkin, sage and pine nuts are a combination destined to go together...

Spicy Beanburgers with Courgette

This has turned out to be by far our favourite new recipe of the Summer season. It was so exciting to make our own burgers for the first time, and SO easy. These little fellas could be created with so many different ingredients added into the basic mix, depending on the season, although we’re struggling to think how they could get any tastier than in this version.

Thanks to our friend David_d from the Ooffoo community for suggesting we give them a go.

Spicy Beanburgers with Courgette

This has turned out to be by far our favourite new recipe of the Summer season. It was so exciting to make our own burgers for the first time, and SO easy. These little fellas could be created with so many different ingredients added into the basic mix, depending on the season, although we’re struggling to think how they could get any tastier than in this version.

Thanks to our friend David_d from the Ooffoo community for suggesting we give them a go.

Squash And Coconut Soup

Squashes keep well throughout the winter and, although the recipe suggests butternut, any orange-fleshed squash will do. The coconut is deliciously sweet with the squash.

Got one? Send us your recipe!

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