VegBox Recipes

Globe Artichoke

Globe Artichoke Most people have heard of artichoke hearts and would recognise them on pizzas or in Italian pasta dishes. But relatively few people would correctly identify its source as the globe artichoke.

This is a high effort veggie, but definitely delicious.

In Season?
The main crop is available from June to November and the young artichokes can often be eaten with much less preparation than older varieties, where the "thistle" is more pronounced and scratchy.


Buy?
Choose artichokes that feel heavy for their size (i.e. they're not dried out) and which have firm, fleshy outer scales.
Store?
Store in the fridge for 5-7 days. They taste best when used fresh.
Cook?
Artichoke cooking is really simple - just boil them. It's the preparation that takes the effort...

Remove all but 1cm of the stalk.

Cut the top 1/4 off each leaf with scissors. This removes the spike at the tip of the leaf, which is really quite sharp!

If you can open up the artichoke and remove the hairy thistle, do so, otherwise leave until after cooking.

Cook in boiling water for 15 - 30 minutes, until tender.

Quick ideas:

Globe Artichoke With Vinaigrette

Prepare as described and cook for 15 - 30 minutes, until the outer leaves are tender at the base. Pull off a leaf at a time and dip in lemon juice or vinaigrette. Use your teeth to pull the flesh off the base of the leaf. Throw away the rest of the leaf.

Continue until you're left with the heart and the flowery thistle. Cut off the thistle (it scratches if you eat it) and then enjoy the heart - at last!

More Globe Artichoke Information

It takes a lot of effort to eat an artichoke. Hence the popularity of ready-prepared artichoke hearts, marinated and stored in jars or cans.

See how to use artichokes, to find out more.

It is believed that globe artichokes were first cultivated in the Eastern Mediterranean in the 12th Century and then introduced to France by Catherine de Medici when she married the French king in the 16th Century.

Did you know...?
The globe artichoke is actually the edible flower bud of the plant.

Fried Artichokes
This recipe was sent in by Caroline, who says "Fried artichokes are very typically eaten in Tuscany during the two bouts of 'artichoke season' - spring and autumn. During these periods, you'll find them on any menu in the restaurants as a side dish ('contorno')...washed down with Chianti!"

Sounds good to us!
Ingredients
(Serves 6)

6 artichokes
Half a lemon
1 cup and a half of flour (this can be half white and half wholemeal)
1 can of cheap beer
Olive oil for frying (it MUST be olive oil!)
Salt to season

Method
  1. Pepare the artichokes as usual (discard outer leaves and any wispy flower bits inside).
  2. ut the stem, leaving 1 inch attached.
  3. Cut in half and then into wedges....usually you get 8 wedges out of one artichoke.
  4. Leave in a bowl of water and lemon juice for about half an hour.
  5. In the meantime, mix up a batter with the flour and beer, starting with the flour in a bowl and gradually adding the beer until you have a runny consistency, like single cream.
  6. Heat 1 cm of olive oil in a shallow frying pan.
  7. Dry the artichoke wedges.
  8. When the oil is slightly smokey, dip the wedges in the batter and fry, turning once. This is easy if you use 2 forks.
  9. Drain and season....yummy!

Cupboard-To-Table

1 hour

Suggested Globe-artichoke Recipes

Fried Artichokes

This recipe was sent in by Caroline, who says "Fried artichokes are very typically eaten in Tuscany during the two bouts of 'artichoke season' - spring and autumn. During these periods, you'll find them on any menu in the restaurants as a side dish ('contorno')...washed down with Chianti!"

Sounds good to us!

Tomato And Artichoke Brunch

This tomato and artichoke brunch recipe was inspired by a glut of fresh, ripe tomatoes and the arrival of a jar of pickled artichokes from Suma, our wholesaler. It's so quick to make and it's absolutely delicious.

Warm Summer Courgette & Runner Bean Salad With Artichoke Hearts

This delicious summer salad is best served warm. The courgettes and runner beans take on a buttery flavour, enhanced by the creaminess of the artichoke hearts.

Got one? Send us your recipe!

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